Last edited by Malagami
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Bill C-31, an act to amend the Indian Act found in the catalog.

Bill C-31, an act to amend the Indian Act

Canada. Parliament. House of Commons.

Bill C-31, an act to amend the Indian Act

as passed by the House of Commons.

by Canada. Parliament. House of Commons.

  • 126 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published in Ottawa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indian Act.,
  • Indians of North America -- Ontario -- Legal status, laws, etc.,
  • Indigenous peoples -- Ontario -- Government relations.

  • The Physical Object
    Pagination88 p. ; 28 cm.
    Number of Pages88
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22119665M

      In , with the passage of Bill C, changes were made to the Indian Act to address some, but not all, issues of sex discrimination. “Current to Octo Last amended on April 1, ”Author: Michael Shires. An Act to amend the Indian Act The Amendments: Bill C, An Act to amend the Indian Act.. 1 The Amendments: Bill C-3, Gender Equity Bill S-3, An Act to amend the Indian Act (elimination of sex -based inequities in registration) was introduced in the Senate on 25 October File Size: KB.

    -After the Progressive Conservatives formed the new government, it moved quickly to deal with sexual discrimination in the Indian Act by introducing Bill C, (an Act to Amend the Indian Act). The bill was heralded as ending sexual discrimination in the Indian Act (where women would no longer lose status by marrying out) and providing band. This act eliminated certain discriminatory provisions of the Indian Act, including the section that resulted in Indian women losing their Indian status when they married non-Status men. Bill C enabled people affected by the discriminatory provisions of the old Indian Act to apply to have their Indian status and membership restored.

    Bill S-3, An Act to amend the Indian Act (elimination of sex-based inequities in registration) was introduced in the Senate of Canada, on Octo Under Stage II, the Government committed to launching a collaborative process with First Nations and other Indigenous groups to address broader issues relating to Indian registration, Band. The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to. Accordingly, Bill S-3, An Act to amend the Indian Act (elimination of sex-based inequities in registration), was read the second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs.


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Bill C-31, an act to amend the Indian Act by Canada. Parliament. House of Commons. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Since receiving royal assent on June 28thBill CAn Act to Amend the Indian Act (S.C. c) has had a profound and some­ times devastating impact on Aboriginal communities across Canada.

The legislation itself has lead to legal disputes,1 a host of internal con­ flicts, and may well lead to intergovernmental conflicts over service de­File Size: KB. Native women, supported by many men, fought a prolonged battle to have these sections repealed; they won when Bill C, an Act to amend the Indian Act, made retroactive to Apwas given An act to amend the Indian Act book Assent in June This amendment also repealed many other archaic sections of the Act and provided for.

Inthe Indian Act was amended by the passage of Bill C to remove discrimination against women, to be consistent with section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms[1], included in the amendment of the Constitution. Coming into effect on ApSection 15 provided that “every individual is equal before and under.

Indian Act (Bill. C) 6(1)(a) that person was. registered or entitled to be registered immediately prior to Ap 6(1)(b) that person is a member of a body of persons that has been declared by the Governor in Council.

on or after Ap to be a band.(ex.: Qalipu) 6(1)(c) Restoration of Indian status to:File Size: 2MB. C, which significantly amended the existing Indian Act, and the coming into effect of section 15 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.1 Sec-tion 15 was partially responsible for the intro-duction of Bill C The Canadian government introduced Bill C to address, among other things, gender discrimination in the system of Indian status Cited by: 1.

Section ninety of the said Act is hereby amended by adding after the words, "or non-treaty Indian," in the ninth line thereof, the words, "or of any person, or upon any other part of the reserve or special reserve, or sells, exchanges with, barters, supplies or gives to any person on any reserve or special reserve, any kind of intoxicant.".

THE INDIAN BILLS OF LADING ACT, ACT NO. 9 OF 11th April, An Act to amend the Law relating to Bills of Lading. Preamble Whereas by the custom of merchants a bill of lading of goods being transferable by endorsement, the property in the goods may thereby pass to the endorsee, but nevertheless all rights in respect of the contract contained in the bill of.

The Indian Act Optional Modification Act (Bill C) Comprehensive amendments to the Indian Act were attempted in through Bill C, which called for significant "interim" reforms to the Indian Act in several areas, including band governance, by-law authority and legal capacity, and the regulation of reserve land and resources.

texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. National Emergency Library. Top An Act to amend "The Indian Act, " [microform]: Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item. History, politics, arts, science & more: the Canadian Encyclopedia is your reference on Canada.

Articles, timelines & resources for teachers, students & public. On Decemthe federal government passed Bill C An Act to Amend the Indian Act, SC c It says the Act is part of its incremental approach to improving conditions for First Nations communities.

Reception of the bill has been mixed. On the one hand. 4 Bill C, An Act to Amend the Indian Act, SCc Bill C was enacted as Indian Act, RSCc I 5 Minutes of Proceedings and Evidence of the Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, 33rd Parl, 1st Sess (7 March) at – (David Crombie, Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development).File Size: KB.

generation cut-off clause". [9] Under amendments to the Indian Act (Bill C), Michel Band members have individual Indian status restored. No provision made in Bill C for the restoration of status under the Band enfranchisement provision that was applied to. Bill C also fully removed all remaining enfranchisement clauses, though the minister of Indigenous affairs retains broad and sweeping powers in some areas, and the Indian Act remains a target of criticism.

Bill C reinstated status to people who had been denied it for discriminatory reasons, and gave bands control of their membership lists. Enacted in June – retroactive to 17 April – Bill C, An Act to amend the Indian Act, aimed to remove discrimination from the Act, restore rights to those who had lost them and recognize First Nations control over band Size: KB.

Parents or Guardians may apply on behalf of a child (15 years of age or younger) or a dependent adult pursuant to the Indian Act amendments, Gender Equity in Indian Registration Act, if all three of the following conditions are met. the child's or dependent adult's grandmother lost her entitlement to registration as a Status Indian as a result of marrying a non-Indian.

In Canada passed Bill C re-instating enfranchised people with Indian Status. However, Bill C also allowed for bands to take control of. Indian Act. The CBA Section asks whether Bill C-3 would actually promote gender equality in Indian registration.

Our answer is sort of, but not quite. BILL C AND SHARON McIVOR. InBill C 3. amended the. Indian Act. to provide equal treatment of male and female Indians prospectively for entitlement to registration as a status Indian.

The next day, it reported the bill back to the House with amendments, one of which was a revised title, An Act to amend the Indian Act in response to the Superior Court of Quebec decision in Descheneaux c.

Canada (Procureur général). The report was concurred in on 21 Juneand the bill was read aFile Size: KB. Bill S-3 proposes to amend the Indian Act to eliminate known sex-based inequities in Indian registration, including remedies for the issues identified in Descheneaux: The Cousins Issue: The differential treatment of first cousins whose grandmother lostFile Size: KB.

physical disability.” Motivated to address the Indian Act, the government passed Bill C, An Act to Amend the Indian Act, in April Its stated goals were to address the gen - der discrimination of the Indian Act, to restore Indian status to those who had been involuntarily enfranchised (those.– Bill C amends the Indian Act in response to the Lovelace case to restore Indian status and band membership to Indigenous women who lost it through marrying out, but the women were re-instated under section 6(1)(c), instead of full 6(1)(a) status and thus their entitlement to transmit status was more restricted than their Indian male counterparts.

They could transmit Author: Pam Palmater.The Indian Act originally administered by the Indian Department through Indian Agents has gone through numerous amendments since its creation in It is now administered by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), formerly the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND).Author: Susan Manitowabi.